October 30, 2006

Give Your FICO 30 Minutes

Are you considering buying or refinancing a home?  Here’s good advice: increase your credit score and lower your interest rate. If you’re new to this site, then you should know that we’re not selling credit repair books or tapes and we’re not selling credit repair services.  As a matter of fact, we’re not selling anything.  Mortgage and real estate industry professionals created this website to provide you with the information that you need to improve your credit score – free of charge.  We believe in the golden rule and thought that just maybe, if we helped you to raise your credit score by more than a few points, you would consider choosing one of our sponsors to grant you that low interest rate mortgage loan.  Either way, I want you to have a higher FICO and the only investment that is required on this site is that of time, 30 minutes to be exact.

The reader should know that the harm caused by a lower FICO score is not a small matter.  According to the California Association of Realtors September 2004 letter to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, “For those few homebuyers who would still qualify for a loan with the reduced credit score, they will have to pay substantially more for the loan through higher interest rates.  As a result, the homebuyer will be forced to pay much more for the home over the life of the loan.  For example, a quarter-percent interest rate increase in a 30-year fixed rate loan would cost the consumer over $6,000 in extra interest paid for every $100,000 financed”.

(source=ftc.gov/os/comments/fcradispute/OP-1209_115.pdf)

Every Saturday the Broken Credit Blog hosts an online seminar titled “Raise Your Credit Score”.  In this thirty-minute presentation, you will learn how to obtain your free credit report, dispute inaccurate items, the benefits of re-aging, and how to improve your FICO even if you have no bad credit.  Advance registration is required and we welcome you to join us this Saturday.  

Free Credit Score Seminar

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